Why Ryzen 9 3950x is IMPOSSIBLY GOOD! [REVIEW] (vs. 9900K, 3900x, 3970x)

Why Ryzen 9 3950x is IMPOSSIBLY GOOD! [REVIEW] (vs. 9900K, 3900x, 3970x)


When I heard rumors of AMD Bringing a 16 core
32 cores on a mainstream desktop CPU, I just didn’t believe it because it sounded too
good to be true, but when we began to see more confirmations of them releasing this
CPU, I thought that even if it was possible, we wouldn’t be seeing high enough clocks
or single threaded performance, or something somewhere will hold it back from performing
well in workloads like gaming. But now after experiencing the excellence
of the CPU that we’ll be taking a look at today, the impossible has become a reality,
and I don’t use a sentence like that lightly. Hey guys, I am Siddharth, and this is AMD
Ryzen 9 3950x review. This year has been a big win for AMD. Thanks to their new 7 nm Zen 2 architecture,
they can offer better performance in a variety of workloads, along with great efficiency
and thermals. AMD has delivered to their promise of continuing
to support the AM4 socket, and even with this major microarchitecture change, even an older
B450 motherboard can be used, even to handle the higher end Ryzen 3000 CPUs, although you
won’t get the PCIe 4.0 support with them. The specifications on the 3950x are something
you really wouldn’t have expected to be real even a year ago. This is a 16 core 32 thread part as a mainstread
desktop CPU, with a massive 64MB cache which still manages to keep the same TDP as its
12 core sibling. The PCIe 4.0 support means that even with
20 PCIe lanes, you’ll have enough bandwidth to handle a lot of PCIe storage and expansion
devices, and unless you are doing some really high end workstation grade stuff, you really
shouldn’t find this mainstream desktop platform to be limiting. We are going to be comparing between a 9900K,
3900x, and if you’re wondering why I have a 2000 dollar 32 core HEDT beast of a processor
in this comparison, it’s because these are all the CPUs I have and I don’t want to
not include the 3970x. I am aware that Intel has a new 9900KS, but
that is almost the same CPU as 9900K. Our test systems for mainstream CPUs are going
to be almost identical, and we’ll be using a 360mm radiator to cool these CPUs, but the
3970x will be on a 240 mm radiator and you can watch its review for more details on this. All of this testing is going to be on stock
CPU and memory settings, without any game modes turned on, and my 9900K really doesn’t
like going over 4.7 GHz so I wouldn’t have been able to overclock that anyways. In Cinebench, we see the 3950x scoring a number
that has been reserved for HEDT class of CPUs, and while it doesn’t look that big of a
deal in front of 3970x, it really is something which you wouldn’t have been able to find
on a mainstream desktop CPU. The single core cinebench test really surprised
me, as the 3950x beat both lower and higher core count CPUs, but all this comparison shows
is how excellent Zen 2 has been performing for single core workloads, as we see an almost
matching performance regardless of how many cores we have, and even the 32 core 3970x
is able to match the performance of 9900K, which hasn’t traditionally been the case
in Intel vs. AMD comparisons. In POV ray we see a the Ryzen CPUs scaling
very well, but not perfectly, but this bar graph really doesn’t look good for Intel’s
best consumer platform CPU. POV ray single thread is still a close comparison
for all these CPUs, but that is a good thing. V Ray is able to make a really good use of
multiple cores, so we see unsurprisingly proportionate increase in performance here. Blender workloads are one of the most relevant
tests for CPUs, and the 3950x really cuts down the time for both the classroom, and
the car render. This is a really great value option if you
need to work a lot in blender. Adobe Premiere Pro video render is another
very important workload, which hasn’t favoured Ryzen CPUs in their earlier generation, but
here we see the 9900K getting beaten, and we may have seen bigger differences if we
tested this with 32 GB RAM. Handbrake video conversion doesn’t seem
to be able to take advantage of multiple cores, so here we don’t see a big difference between
these CPUs. 7 Zip compression was another benchmark with
some interesting and unexpected results, but in the decompression test, the 3950x was fully
able to show its potential, and we see really great results delivered by its 32 threads. Testing the 3950x for gaming was a really
pleasant surprise, as it was able to outperform even the 9900K on multiple occasions, even
if they difference may have been within the margin for error. In Assasins Creed Odyssey we see a slight
advantage for the blue team, even though the HEDT Ryzen somehow managed to almost match
it. CS:GO results again show some difference between
the 9900K and mainstream Ryzens, but the FPS is much more than what the monitors with highest
refresh rate can offer. Shadow of the Tomb Raider also favours Intel
CPUs, if you are going to play at full HD and that too on medium settings. Ashes of the singularity CPU focused benchmark
demonstrates the most dramatic difference between the 3950x and 9900k, while in the
GPU benchmark the 3970x seems to forget that it’s a workstation grade CPU, outperforming
the 9900K Power consumption comparison gives us a very
surprising result, where 3950x takes up LESS power than 3970x which has LESS number of
cores, and this can be very confusing and make you check your number multiple times,
but then if you check the voltages in HWInfo, you’ll find that the 3950x is actually able
to run at a lower voltage than 3900x, which is a result of better binning of silicon,
which can manage to stay stable at lower voltages. We didn’t try undervolting the 3900x, but
an average sample of 3950x should definitely be able to run normally on lower voltages. So the thermal results were also not surprising
for me, because the 3950x runs COOLER than the 12 core 3900x, and the 9900K shows very
embarrassing results in comparison, crossing 90 celcius even though both of them used a
360mm radiator for cooling. We have a shorter cooler for 3970x, but again,
you can watch its review for more details. So overall, the 3950x is so good that it almost
doesn’t make sense. You have a 16 core CPU that excels in single
threaded workloads, it is as good of a gaming CPU that you will practically need, AND it
runs cooler and consumes less power, and you can use it on previous generation AM4 motherboards. There really aren’t any downsides to this
processor, and I don’t think that we have seen something that has been as exciting as
this CPU in a long time. AMD is really killing it with their Zen 2
architecture, and they really don’t seem to have plans to slow down. The 3950x is basically an HEDT processor on
a mainstream consumer platform, and you even have ECC memory support and the PCIe bandwidth
that you will need even for some high end applications. So at the price of 750 US dollars, we are
seeing an increase in the price of top level CPUs on the mainstream platform, but for something
that is as special as this, I do think that it is totally worth it if you can make use
of the extra cores that this CPU has. Having a use for the extra cores will be a
very important question when it comes to deciding which CPU you should be going for, because
if you have deep pockets, its easy to be tempted by the technical impressiveness of this CPU,
but the great thing about AMD’s Ryzen 3 lineup is that you don’t have to get the
highest end chips to get an amazing desktop experience. For gaming you can easily go with a Ryzen
7 3700x which is also an 8 core CPU that is available at a really great price, the 3900x
is also great for the pro sumers who work and play on their computers, but if you have
a use case for it, the 3950x is in a league of its own, and even though AMD does have
a 32 core monster Threadripper 3970x that I also reviewed recently, from the perspective
of an enthusiast, the 3950x really provides a value that we have not seen on a desktop
CPU. AMD has almost changed the rules of the game,
and Intel will need something REALLY special to be able to make a comeback against the
Ryzen 3000 and the future Ryzen series, and even after they succeed with their upcoming
10 or 7 nanometer process, I don’t think that the battle is going to be easy for them. So do check out my Ryzen 3900x build which
I upgraded to a 3950x, and also don’t miss this very special Threadripper 3970x compact
that was quite challenging to complete. Let me know what you think about the 3950x
in the comments section below, and I’ll also have links if you want to buy it or check
its current prices. So thanks for watching, gives this video a
thumbs up if you liked it, or a thumbs down if you disliked it. Subscribe with bell for more awesome videos
on tech, and I’ll see you in the next one.

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