“PS5” vs PS4 Pro today!

“PS5” vs PS4 Pro today!


(upbeat music) One of the biggest conversations
in gaming right now is the impending release of
next generation consoles. With Xbox already talking about Scarlett coming out some time next year and PlayStation 5 also being in the works. And the big question though
is what kinda real difference we’re gonna see between those systems and what we currently get
with enhanced versions of the PS4 and Xbox One. Well it was exactly this question that caused our good friend Austin Evans to actually build his own fake PS5 that he thankfully let us borrow so we could compare it to a PS4 Pro. Now of course we don’t have
the super hard specs just yet on what exactly the PS5 is made out of, but we do know some main
numbers to work with which is how Austin approached
building the system. First off is a processor, which is actually probably the closest to being like what is
going to be in the PS5. Austin used an AMD Ryzen 7 3700X, which is based on the same
Zen 2 core architecture and also relies on having eight cores. The one thing Austin did
with this processor though is that he actually under
clocked it a little bit because most console version
processors run a little lower because both the power
demands and heat production. If you wanna have a nice
compact looking small system, you can’t have it running that hot. And as for the graphics card, this is where things get
a little more ballpark-y because we don’t know exactly
what’s going to be in the PS5 and in fact it is going to
be a custom card from AMD so it’s not gonna be exactly like something you can buy on the market. But in order to get as close as possible, Austin made use of an AMD Radeon 5700, which makes use of the
same core architecture they said they will be using for the PS5. But as far as how actually
powerful that card is versus how powerful the
one in the PS5 will be, we just don’t know for sure. So for the sake of kinda safety, Austin went for a kind of mid range option to get the closest base a possible. Rounding things out, it also makes use of 16 gigabytes of RAM and includes currently one of the fastest SSDs on the market, which Sony did say that in their
works for the PlayStation 5 the SSD you’ll make use of is faster than something you can currently buy. So we’re gonna take this PlayStation 5, play a game that’s available
both on it and PS4 Pro, and really take a look at the difference we’re seeing in performance. So we’re playing Monster Hunter World on both this PS5 and the PS4 Pro. There’s a couple of reasons why I chose this game in particular. First off, while it is
a multi platform game that is on PC as well as Xbox One and PS4, it is definitely targeted more at console including the fact that it
came out way earlier on those. It’s also interesting because
unlike most games on console where they’re hard capped
at a specific frame rate, usually 30 frames, the
PlayStation version of this actually will display at a
higher, more unsaved frame rates. So that way we have an
exact point of comparison for how they’re both running
instead of being like oh, this one’s just always capped
at 30 and this one is free. – [Computer Voice] Frame rate. So right now I’m just messing around one of the main quests of the game and we’re currently running
this in 1080p resolution. So that’s being compared
to the performance version of the PS4 Pro playing it. Let’s go ahead and pull
up the frame rate monitor. And it’s currently jumping
around 75 up to 94. So that is a significant upgrade running at the same resolution. It’s worth noting the PC version does have some graphical enhancements as well, so it’s actually a little more demanding. Oh no, I’m being very bad right now. Yeah, still seeing it. It’s jumping a little bit but it’s hanging around at the lowest 75. Let’s take a look at how things run. We got the PS4 Pro set to
prioritize frame rate mode. On this we’re getting 40. And again, there’s also more
graphical effects going on in the PC version that
we’re seeing on this PS4. Roll again, it’s still falling behind what the the PS5 was capable of ’cause we were seeing
better graphic effects and smoother frame rates going even higher than what we’re seeing here. I also love, by the way, that anytime you start pushing the PS4 Pro
it is a jet engine of a fan. I mean the Xbox One X gets a little loud sometimes with the right game. In fact I was playing Controller earlier and I heard it lightly, but the PS4 Pro is just
on a whole other level when it comes to the fan noise. (fan blowing) – [Computer Voice] Resolution. So let’s actually go ahead and see how this runs comparison on
a more demanding resolution. So let’s go into the settings. Now before I was running on all the highest graphic settings possible. I’m gonna leave it there. We’re gonna keep the frame rate limit off, turn Vsync off ’cause
we don’t want anything capping how well it can run although it’s definitely gonna be a lower frame rate at a higher resolution. Let’s go ahead and bump
this all the way up to 4K and see how it does. All right, so we’ve restarted
the game in 4K resolution and definitely we’re already
seeing the frame rate being a little hoarse just visually. I’ll see what the actual is
in a bit once we’re in game. But an important thing to note is that compared to the PS4 Pro, the pro version when you’re
running it in resolution mode, it’s still only actually at 1800p. So this is at a higher resolution
than the PS4 Pro version is even capable of doing. Now the reason for that
is the PS4 Pro version doesn’t wanna give you a
really, really low frame rate ’cause if you’re running that one in performance mode at 1800p, it’s getting about 30 frames, little less, kinda jumps around a little. Let’s see how it does on here. Oh, this frame rate is so much lower. Okay, so running around right now. Let’s pop that open, see what
the performance is saying. So right now we’re actually
seeing a frame rate not 30 frame steady, but it’s
going in kinda the mid-20s. We’re seeing about 22 to 25 right now, which is definitely not something I would normally wanna play at, but considering the fact
that the PS4 Pro version is at a noticeably lower resolution and it’s barely doing a
higher frame rate than that, this is still a pretty
impressive difference. With resolution mode on,
Monster Hunter hits 1800p, which is still a lot better
than 1080, but it’s not 4K. And it’s worth noting
that when you do that, you are sacrificing probably what I’d say is the most important aspect
of a game, the frame rate. It’s stiLl fine, it’s okay, it’s usable. It’s hovering around 30. And it’s important to point out that it’s hovering around
30, it’s not stable 30. What that means it that most of the time the game looks fine. A lot of stuff on console
runs at 30 frames. But once a lot of things start happening. You got more monsters on the
screen, you’re swinging a lot, effects are going off, you start to notice
little bits of slowdown. It’s worth noting this is still a great looking game on the PS4 Pro. I personally wouldn’t usually have it in resolution mode like
this, but it looks good. It’s just that when you
compare it to the PC slash our mock PS5, it falls behind. Something that happens
crazy too in resolution mode is that it definitely sacrifices
what it’s rendering up for some enemies in the distance. So monsters up close look like
they’re moving pretty smooth. In the distance, they start to have really weird looking movements. Let’s see if I can turn some
of the graphics settings down a little bit and see how well
we can make it run in 4K. So let’s go ahead. We’re gonna keep it at 4K resolution but let’s see how well we
can get the frame rate going if we move ourselves down
to medium graphic settings. You know what? Actually no, let’s just leave it on high. So we went from highest to high, which does take down the
demand it has quite a bit. Okay so again, we are now on 4K resolution but we have brought down
the graphic settings. It’s just a high instead of highest. Part of that is that it is
using lower quality texture so it’s not necessarily the
same kind of degree detail you would see in 4K normally, but it still looks great and is putting out at a 4K resolution. So let’s see what our frame rate is now. Just kinda running around, hitting some stuff, seeing some monsters. So this has boosted us
up to about 35 to 40, which is again higher than
what the PS4 Pro version can do at a much higher resolution. So this is showing us pretty clearly that if the PS5 runs anything like this mock up system right now, there are very, very noticeable
differences in performance. I mean we’re seeing games
that are allowing you to actually play in full 4K resolution, not some kind of upscale trick that’s running at a lower one and still giving you
not just only the same performance of frame rate, but higher. And of course there
still is that trade off of resolution versus frame rate that we’re currently
seeing with the system, but instead of it being
a debate of almost 4K and struggling to be 30 and
then 1080 with a little over 30, now we’re seeing 1080p with
an actual smooth 60 frames which is awesome and
4K with still over 30. So compared to how most
consoles run, that’s awesome. Something else I’ve been
noticing with all the times that I have quit and restarted this game to do different graphic settings is that it’s loading up really quick. Definitely faster than what
we were seeing on the PS4 Pro and a large part of that is due not only to the performance power, but the fact that it is making use of an SSD instead of a hard drive. Oh no, I got hit in the butt by a monster. Now again, a lot of
this is very ballpark-y because the way that our
mock PS5 has been built is based on what we just know
for sure about the PS5 so far. It’s entirely possible that
the system we end up getting is even more powerful than we think or possibly not nearly
as powerful as we hope. Something else we’re noting too is that when you look at the PC
version of a game like this and how it runs versus console, well obviously it runs a lot better because it’s a maxed out high
spec PC that we’re comparing. But oftentimes console version’s games can actually run a little better relative to the hardware they’re running on because they’re designed to run on that specific hardware set
and get the most out of it as opposed to being
something that’s adaptable to a number of different system designs. That’s why when you see certain first party games that
are console exclusive, they look a lot better than
other multi platform games that are trying their best to
work across multiple things. This means that when we
see future exclusive titles to things like the PlayStation 5, they can look even better
than what we’re seeing on Monster Hunter and run
better at the same time. Now as for what this
all means of that claim of the PlayStation 5
being capable of 4K 120, well again, it’s not looking super great right now with that. It’s an idea of are we talking about simultaneously you’re
either or because yes, there is definitely games
that could run in 4K and games that could run 120 frames. Could we see games running
at both of the same time? Probably not very
graphically impressive ones. On top of those differences in graphics, another important thing to note too is the difference we saw in load times. A lot of stuff that was
running off of that SSD was loading up way faster
than what we were seeing on the PS4 Pro which still relies on an old school hard drive. Either way, I think this
is a great test and example to show how much more powerful a next generation system can be compared to the current .5
generation systems we’re seeing like the One X and the PS4 Pro. And it’s gonna be really
interesting to see how those next gen
consoles really perform.

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