How to Go Pro in Fortnite (w/ Ghost Gaming) | NowThis Nerd

How to Go Pro in Fortnite (w/ Ghost Gaming) | NowThis Nerd


I went to my first tournament, So I think after that, they were good. They gave me that year. A lot of parents, don’t give you that year. – Hi, everyone. I’m Moose and recently I sat down with members of Ghost Gaming’s professional Fortnite
team on the eve of the first ever Fortnite World Cup. The esports industry is
growing exponentially. Highly competitive events
for games like Fortnite, Overwatch, Counter-Strike and tons more, are drawing thousands of real life fans and even more online eyeballs. Some experts project
that esports can bring in over a billion dollars in
revenue by the end of 2019, and it’s just getting started. To get a boots on the ground
perspective of the business from the athletes who are
living it every single day, we asked the Ghost Gang
about making the decision to go pro and what the
day-to-day life looks like for some of the most
elite gamers in the world. First, I wanted to find
out how they realized that they might have
what it takes to compete at the highest level. – The first game I probably,
like, actually grided was Call of Duty MW 2. Just
coming home from school playing that until dinner.
After dinner, you get back on the game and you play
with your friends all day. And that was my whole year basically. – It just started by its own, like, I just played a lot. Played, like,
wagers, played for money and then I started getting
invited to scrimmages from Epic Games and then I realized I’m good enough to compete. – When Fortnite first
came out, I was playing, I was like playing people for money, and I ended up racking up
like ten thousand dollars just playing other
people. And then I started streaming and once the first
like Fortnite tournament came out, I did really well. I blew up and then it exploded from there. The way Ghost found me, I
actually had a friend that, like, he told the scout.
He, like, recommended me. They actually found me
from the little, the way when I was playing people for money. They just took a risk
on me and picked me up, and it ended up working out. – I worked on a golf
course for four years. So when I first got signed to Ghost I was still working at the golf course and going to school full-time too. So I was trying to manage all of it because when I first signed it wasn’t like the crazy contract.
Before tournaments started I was basically just signing just to help get my name out and everything. – Did you drive the cart to
like pick up all the balls? – Yeah. – That’s awesome. (sound of swinging golf
club hitting a golf ball) (upbeat dance music) It takes a lot of hours to
make it on to an elite team like Ghost, and once you’re on board gaming isn’t just a hobby
anymore, it’s a job. – So while my sleep schedule’s good I like to wake up, play around noon. I’ll start scrims around five. After scrims are over, which
honestly probably ends about eleven sometimes
depending how long we play and then I’ll probably stream after throughout the night for a little bit and then go, go to bed. I love doing this. – I usually stream eight hours a day. And, you know, I have a girlfriend now in California so that
takes a lot of time up too but mainly all the Ghost
stuff usually is like when we go to events and like we all meet up is mostly when they try
to take a lot of my time. – So my normal schedule,
I’ll basically just wake up and hop right on my computer. I don’t really eat breakfast or anything, so I just hop on and warm up. What’s going on guys? Bizzle here. Six to eight hours a day.
And after that trying to watch people play Fortnite
or even play it more. But its basically an all day thing with any esport I think it is. There’s not really any down time. You have to be playing 24-7. Oh my God. – Getting paid to play
video games and build a massive streaming
audience at the same time sounds like a pretty sweet gig,
but it’s not without risks. Just like traditional sports, the chances of injury are very real. – The wrists are really, really common. I’ve had a little bit of wrist injuries. Like, just, nothing major, but, I know a lot of players
have like tendonitis, and they just develop stuff like that because it’s just constantly
moving your mouse around. – Are you a mouse and keyboard
or are you a controller guy? – Mouse and keyboard, yeah. – I think the main issue
among most players is probably like carpal tunnel. I use therapy putty for myself, and that really helps me. Basically I use different
strengths of putty. So you can constantly working up and strengthening your hands. – This is funny. So, the worst injury that I’ve had that has
affected my game play, is me picking at my nails and my skin. Yeah. It’s just my fault. I got to stop doing that. Bad habit. I play like a weird way
with the controller. Basically I use my like pointer finger on like the four buttons. So basically if I like mess
with my nail or my skin then I have to press
down, it starts to hurt. But besides that, I’ve not
really had any hand injuries or anything. My girlfriend
massages my hands at night, so I got that going for me. – Esports is still a young industry. And for a lot of Ghost
Gang, their parents took some convincing to get on board. – So at first they
weren’t supportive at all. They were like, you got
to get off your computer. The first tournament that
I went to, I got invited, we were actually going
on vacation that day. So I had to convince them to stay back which was actually really good because that’s what
basically got me into Ghost. So, yeah, after that,
they were supportive. After I was making money and stuff. – Yeah. I notice that seems
to be a theme with everybody, it’s like, my family
was a little skeptical and then I started making money. – There are a lot of parents that don’t give you that year. They won’t
let you play the hours I did. Just the fact, like I said,
yeah, they’re a gaming family. They were more understanding
than other people so it was pretty easy for me. – So your folks might
be a little skeptical at least until all that prize
money starts rolling in. In their short careers,
Ghost Gang has already racked up some serious dough. And the pots just keep getting bigger. – What’s the biggest
prize you’ve won so far? – $37.5K. And that was my first event. – $50K – TwitchCon. Thirty seven thousand. I ended up winning like another
fifteen thousand off that. And then like the thirty
thousand from the kill bonus. All together it was like $60, 70K. – Not too shabby. – Yeah that was a good day. – PAX West, I made a little
over two hundred thousand. – Jesus. That’s how much
I spent on law school. – My first tournament ever. – With that kind of money on the line, playing games for a living is certainly a tantalizing prospect,
so I asked the Ghost Gang if they had any tips for aspiring pros. – Play the game. Grind as much as you can. Watch other pros, like the best, play. Try to copy some strats. – Make sure you use all social medias. Use Instagram, YouTube, Twitter. Definitely network. It’s one
thing I didn’t do too much, I still don’t do too
much now, which I should. Make sure you try to play with people. If you are good or
you’re funny or you have some sort of characteristic
that people like you for, I mean those people will come to you. – Right now Ghost Gang
is living the dream, and with Fortnite showing
no signs of slowing, it almost seems weird to
think about the future. Still, I closed out by
asking these athletes if they had any plans for
their post esports careers. – I’d love to stay in the
scene. Like the esports scene, whether that’s working
for an org or casting or doing something coaching
related or I could always go back to school. I was a
cybersecurity major before this, so I would also love to
finish school and do that. – Cool. Where’d you go to college? – A local college. I went
to Penn State my first year and then came home to change majors. – Honestly, I used to do a lot of coding so that’d be really cool
to make games and stuff. – That would be awesome. – So my plan definitely is
to like keep my brand going. Keep growing. I just
want to take the route maybe just being able to like
stream whatever games I want. I know that my professional
career will not be here forever, so maybe just like chill and
just play single player games. Maybe an org one day,
there’s a lot of pro players that are creating orgs.
That’s a big thing right now. I just want to be able to live
my life. Keep playing games. That’s my dream. (rhythmic orchestral music)

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